Learning Ideas for Spoonies

What colleges have you attended?

Day 3 of Bloganuary and I’m still going. I’m not a huge fan of talking about myself but I’m fascinated by the journey of others. Where they started, the path they have taken and where they are now. I’m thoroughly looking forward to reading the posts of fellow bloggers joining in with Bloganuary.

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You Must Have a Degree

I’m based in the UK so colleges for us are universities. I would say that when I was at school I felt like going to university was everything. I had to go. Now I look back and I wonder if there were other paths I could have taken. Especially, knowing how my health was going to deteriorate.

My main driving force for going to university was that I wanted to be a teacher. Therefore, I needed a degree. When I look back now I didn’t have the greatest experience of further education. It wasn’t that I didn’t love the learning; I adored the learning. It was that I was plagued by health issues. I didn’t get to enjoy ‘student life’ and keeping up was hard and at times impossible. It’s again a reminder of how ableist society is.

My University Strife Life

  • Aston University – Business Administration and Applied Chemistry (a course that only 4 people took). Completed but had to complete in 4 years not 3 due to ill health.
  • Exeter University – PGCE with Mathematics Specialism. One of the hardest years – asthma flared with so many hospital admissions and seizures most nights.
  • Bath Spa University – SENCo Qualification. Didn’t finish due to ill health.
  • Bath Spa University – Academic Tutor. Had to leave this job that I LOVED due to ill health.

Many Ways to Learn

Due to my experiences being plagued by ill health and invisible disabilities I’m determined to make sure my daughter knows that long academic study is not the only way to feel fulfilled.

The learning that I do with her daily through nature, books and creative pursuits fill my cup and spur on my lifelong love of learning more than anything. Learning is all around us.

Learning Ideas for Spoonies

On a day I can’t predict how well I will be – #SpoonieLife. My day can ebb and flow and you have to take the opportunities when you can and learn to rest when needed. Learning opportunities that I enjoy as well as the learning with my daughter include:

  • Online free learning opportunities through sites like Eventbrite.
  • Duolingo – I love this app. I’ve been learning German lately.
  • YouTube – I laugh when I think about this one as I’ve only recently discovered how amazing this platform is for learning. I was introduced to it my one of the Nan’s at the arts and crafts community group I volunteer at.
  • Podcasts – I wouldn’t be without podcasts now. My daughter takes a lot of settling at night and I’ve recently started wearing this sleep mask that plays my podcasts through the mask. It’s great to do a little learning.
  • Libby is the other app I love that has magazines that widen my experiences.
  • I’ve just started dipping my toe in the water of Borrow Box non-fiction titles too.

I’d love to know if you have other ideas that would be perfect for a spoonie to learn – drop me a message in the comments.

2 thoughts on “Learning Ideas for Spoonies”

  1. I enjoyed my college days since my disability isn’t exactly invisible, I had some accommodations made which was helpful. I didn’t really think about ableism until my own children were grown. They pointed out the things I assumed were just a part of living with a disability.

    1. I didn’t think about it either until looking back now. I think I consider it more now for my daughter rather than myself. I’m invisible disabled and my daughter is often invisible but when she needs to use her wheelchair becomes visible. I’ve found it tricky to help her navigate.

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